1. Your Light Has Come
    By: Richard Bruxvoort Colligan

    A simple chant around Isaiah 60:1-4. This Epiphany piece can be sung with minimal accompaniment, and can be sung in canon. Use it as a theme song throughout the Epiphany season or to feature the texts from Isaiah. Learn More

  2. You Give Me A New Song
    By: Andra Moran

    “You Give Me A New Song” ("Number 40") uses catchy call-and-response to quickly engage a congregation in the text of Psalm 40:1-3. "You Give Me A New Song!" is sung with an exuberant, heartfelt refrain that defies regular language-- La, la, la, yeah! This song works well as both an opening song or a sending song. It offers quick scripture memorization and gives opportunity for easy harmonies and a variety of rhythm instruments. It works well for intergenerational gatherings and in settings where song text is not printed or projected. This song is a longtime favorite for fans of Andra Moran's work. Learn More

  3. You Are Welcome Here
    By: Richard Bruxvoort Colligan
    By: Trish Bruxvoort Colligan

    This is a very simple, accessible, upbeat reminder of the Extravagant Welcome at the heart of the Gospel!  Lovely vocals by Trish Bruxvoort Colligan and her prolific husband Richard.  A simple but profound message that "bears the weight of repetition..."  Enjoy!

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  4. You Are The Light
    By: Ken Medema

    A brand new song from the amazing Ken Medema based on Jesus' words in Matthew 5:14-16.  Congregations will pick this up very easily and enjoy singing this catchy tune and lyric in many different liturgical contexts.  This one will also work well with children!

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  5. You Are a Light On My Path
    By: Richard Bruxvoort Colligan

    An upbeat community song for Psalm 119:105-12. Fun to sing, easy to teach. The psalmist sings of the joy and confidence in God among times of real struggle. Clap along! Learn More

  6. Whatever Is True
    By: Andra Moran

    "Whatever Is True" is based on Philippians 4:8-9. Functionally, it makes a great benediction song, sending the congregation out into the world with a reminder to set their minds on truth, kindness, and noble things, and to remember that we are all held with love. The line, "love for a stranger, love for a neighbor, seeking the Christ" is also a powerful text to sing in light of the current crises of immigrants at the southern U.S. borders and the recent heartbreaking reality of refugees from Afghanistan. Learn More

  7. We Are a People of Hope (featuring Stephen Petree)
    By: Thomas Wayne Nichols and Daniel Gordon Chadburn

    We Are a People of Hope can be used as a gathering or sending forth song. It's powerful refrain is easy for congregations to learn and sing. We are ALL the children of God, and we are ALL welcome at God's table. Learn More

  8. Ubuntu
    By: Ken Medema

    Archbishop Desmond Tutu defined the Nguni Bantu word "ubuntu" as "I am, because you are." Inspired by these words, Ken Medema uses "ubuntu" in this highly memorable, rhythmically driven song that celebrates the communion shared, the justice done, and the path forward that is possible when we come together to worship God in this fellowship that knows no bounds. This easy-to-learn piece is suitable as a congregational song for a variety of purposes. Learn More

  9. To the One Making Way
    By: Richard Bruxvoort Colligan

    • The lead sheet product includes lead sheet plus songleader's guide and congregational melody line. 
    • The lyric sheet product is a chord chart.
    • Choral arrangement available at Worldmaking.net.

    This piece can function in 3 ways: the refrain can stand alone as a Gloria, fit for that celebratory moment in worship; the verses can stand alone as a hymn form; all together the song can serve both/either. This song works well with organ, piano or band ensemble.

    This song is licensed via OneLicense.net, CCLI and Worldmaking.net.

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  10. This World Is Pregnant With God
    By: Richard Bruxvoort Colligan

    Picture her sputtering in awe when you imagine Saint Angela of Foligno singing, "This world is pregnant with God." It's a powerful feminine metaphor for change. Sing it in Springtime, either Lent or Eastertide, on Earth Day, or any moment to remember humankind's interconnection with creation. The simple refrain deepens in meaning as the verses suggest dimensions of the metaphor: if creation is a pregnant witness of Christ incarnate in the world, then every living thing is kin (verses 1-2). For verse 3, I was thinking about the parable of the treasure in the field, and of my family's roots in farming. John 16, Mark 13, and Romans 8 refer to labor pain as a metaphor for the pain of transformation and renewal (verse 4). Teach the community the single-phrase refrain, and your music leader or choir sings the verses. Learn More

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